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Textile fibre diagram

Textile Fibre Overview with links

Jute fibre

Jute fibre is the name given to the tissue found to certain plants, which grow principally in India, and the East Indian Islands. The common jute comes mainly from Bengal, the province east of India, where it was first known to science around

Other fibres

Other fibre is a term of the composition label of fabrics containing recycled materials. Many of the textiles produced in the Italian area of Prato are made using yarns spun from blends of recycled wool and, of course, other fibres.

Eight O Seven 807

Eight O Seven 807, a law that allows fabrics cut in the United States, garments assembled in Mexico, the Caribbean and Central American countries. And return to the United States with tariff assessed on added value (sewing).

Retting

Retting is a microbial process that breaks the chemical bonds; it allows that hold the stem together, and separation of the bast fibres happen. This separation needed if linen, flax or hemp fibres are to be used in textile. The two traditional types of retting are field and water retting.

Organic Cotton

Organic cotton growing without any harmful pesticides, herbicides or artificial fertilisers using biologically based and sustainable growing methods such as crop rotation than with highly synthetic and destructive fertilisers.

Hemp fibre

Hemp fibre is a bast fibre probably used first in Asia. The cord is dark tan or brown and is difficult to bleach, but it can be dyed bright and dark colours. The hemp fibre varies widely in length, depending upon their ultimate use. Industrial threads may be several inches long, while fibre used for domestic textiles are about 1.9 to 2.5 cm.

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