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Basalt fibre

Basalt fibre

Basalt fibres made from rock solidified from volcanic lava are suggested by some as the alternative to glass. Until recently, they were used solely in the form of basalt ‘wool’ for thermal insulation purposes, however, new technology open for making them into thin wire fibres. Read more..

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Carbon fibres

Carbon fibres

The use of carbon fibres has only become widespread over the past couple of decades or so, but their growth has been rapid since their inception. The complex series of processes and the inert atmospheres needed for carbon fibre production tend to make them expensive from the environmental standpoint. Read more..

Ceramic fibre

Ceramic fibre

Ceramics are the latest in a series of new materials earmarked for use as fibres. Many of them are oxides, with similar drawbacks as properties and drawbacks as glass, carbon and basalt fibres; usually have a very high melting temperature, which increases the difficulty of manufacture and hence the ecological impact. Read more..

Glass fibres

Glass fibres

Glass, existing in a wide range of types for several end uses, is usually made by melting silica (sand material) at very high temperatures and adding to the melt the necessary fabrics. High temperatures always incur large energy costs. Read more..

Hybrid yarns

Hybrid yarns

Hybrid yarn is a term used on an engineered fibre or material that is composed for a specific purpose or technical functional requirement besides the basic as covering the body or looking fashionable. To create a material with a high level of unique performance to accomplish in a wide spectre of products, type of fibre, yarn needs the material scientists sometimes to modify conventional methods or use newly developed. Read more..

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