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Human rights  Eco-Fashion Encyclopedia

Human Rights


Human rights are a term used to describe a set of individual rights under being a human. These rights are a part of the understanding of positive moral entitlements within a global society. Citizens protected with rights from arbitrary power connected historically with the concept of civil society. Therefore, historical variations and views upon what is and what is not human rights strongly influenced by local culture, economics and social status rank.


Historical Background

The first catalogue of individual rights proclaimed by citizens was the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen adopted by the French National Assembly in 1789. Human rights came upon a Western Enlightenment view influenced by philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, regarded the founding fathers of civil rights.
The post-World War notion of universal human rights, coupled with a thickening network of international rules directly affecting citizens, has not been without problems. It has given birth to the utopia of a global rule-bound society, which remains connected to global civil society in the modern sense of the whole of border-crossing, nonprofit, nongovernmental entities. The incredible growth of the helping industry makes more trouble than solutions as they often are funded by views such as religion.
It causes many varied perspectives, for example, the rights to have less obvious issues such as activities by people outside government, more than commonly imagined. The systems of laws and regulations within one nation are almost impossible to have a full overview. However, the professionals the wealthiest hire help. It increases knowledge inequality, and make bureaucrats gain advantages that ordinary people do not. The public they are employed to serve.


Two of the most accepted and ratified core conventions:


Source and useful information

  • Encyclopedia of civil rights. Helmut K. Anheier, Stefan Toepler, Regina List (Eds). Published 2010 by Springer

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