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Refashioned a part of the fashion revolution. Part Four

Refashioned a part of the fashion revolution. Part Four. Image shows work from Christopher Raeburn, Reet Aus, Renata Meirelles, Dalaleo, Schmidt Takahasai, Tamara Fogle and Plastic Seconds Trashy treasure. Graphics Kenneth Buddha Jeans

PHOTOGRAPHY INFORMATION

  • The image top middle-side Reet Aus Estonian denim collection manufactured entirely from various denim scraps using different shades, deconstructed and patched together. The book Refashioned, making cutting edge clothing from upcycled material by Sass Brown. Published by Laurence King Publishing 2013
  • The image top right-side Renata Meirelles Brazil laser-cutting various materials A necklace or a scarf, often negative cut-outs. From the book Encore! The New Artisans by Olivier Dupon. Published by Tames & Hudson 2015
  • The image middle left-side Brazilian Dalaleo bags are hand-crocheted entirely from salvaged soft-drinks can ring pulls. The book Refashioned, making cutting edge clothing from upcycled material by Sass Brown. Published by Laurence King Publishing 2013
  • The image middle right-side the Berlin-based label Schmidt Takahasai Reanimation made of discarded and used clothing creating new clothes. From the book Remake, It Clothes by Henrietta Thompson and illustrations by Neal Whittington. Published 2012 by Thames & Hudson
  • The image down left-side jacket front from the ASOS label
  • The image down middle-side Tamara Fogle bag made of worn and used Hungarian grain sacks and flour sacks. Use of high quality used materials. The book Refashioned, making cutting edge clothing from upcycled material by Sass Brown. Published by Laurence King Publishing 2013
  • The image down right-side Plastic Seconds Trashy treasure. It’s all a matter of context, repetition of colours, form making accessories and jewellery from upcycled disregarded plastic parts.

Fashion Revolution and the breed of new artisans

Nevertheless, refashioned as terminology taken from the title of the book Refashioned, making cutting edge clothing from upcycled material by Sass Brown. Published by Laurence King Publishing 2013 The paper presents the top designers working with used materials and available materials, most designers and brands presented are small manufactures except for a few such as Nudie, Trash-Couture and Denham(denim). The refashioned wave is at the forefront of the fashion revolution and a part of the new artisan’s movement. Artisans, Encore! The New Artisans by Olivier Dupon. Published by Thames & Hudson 2015 are pure Crafts (his first book titled New Artisans published in 2011). Olivier explains “Craft with a capital letter C is no longer a trend: It is at last enshrined in contemporary life”.

The book covers everything from ceramics, furniture, and textiles and celebrates hand-made, uniqueness, creativity, and quality. Both Refashioned and The New Artisans movement is more than just a design, is political, inspirational and invite for the missing parameters of mass-production the annoying, alike collections you find in the retail stores in the high streets. If removed all logos one does not see any difference or a signature recognisable.

Who makes my clothes?

Refashioned call upon a reason to exists as a brand, a core idea, movement, or revolution. It takes scraps or unwanted materials and creates value out of nothing. It is playful an invites people to regain the lost knowledge of repairing, sewing and creating, a lost artisanship and not very hip besides those who always are in the forefront the cognoscenti. Refashioned emphasis on critical thinking when purchasing not only the look as today (the illusion of the ego are fired up by advertising, messages, intelligent storytelling, mythmaking and communicates often a lifestyle few can ever achieve (look, body, young, glamour’s and carefree). In the 3R’s waste management reduce, reuse and recycle the most crucial question Reduce (do I need it)? A step far away from today consumerism, throwaway culture and corporations planned product obsolescence, sustainability is, is a direct enemy of corporate mass-production and capitalism.

Refashioned represents the opposite of the throw-away culture, of which most people purchase garments for the look and the trend of the day. Does most consumer never ask questions such as where is it manufactured? Who made it? Did they get decent pay? Is it safe? How was it produced? And does the garment contains harmful chemicals? The process from growing the fibre, manufacture fabrics, cut and sew, transportations to the garments finally are visually merchandised is a retail chain is complicated and hidden. Nothing human-made is sustainable; mechanical processes always require energy (transportation, metals, engines, machinery all adds entropy or heat. Only nature plays a zero-game such as the photosynthesis is 100 per cent effective (a modern banking system is 3 per cent the rest 97 per cent is lunch).

Do you know the footprint of your wearing?

If people known facts such as cotton needs approximately 20.000 litres of water to produce 1.1. A kilogram of cotton lint (1kg cotton) almost manufactures seven t-shirts of a low to medium quality t-shirt (substantial quality tee 200-gram cotton). The manufacturing of a modern textile takes an average of 2000 different chemicals. More than 50 per cent of the world market of fibre made from a non-renewable source of energy crude oil (polyester, nylon, technical clothing Gore-Tex etc.).

Cotton fibre Vs. Hemp fibre

Hemp the oldest know industrial thread dated back to Mesopotamia 8000 BFC is a beneficial plant. The hemp plant was used throughout the world since the beginning of time for just about everything that mankind needed. Hemp fibre is 26 times stronger than cotton and ten times longer lasting. The first Levi jeans made out of cloth. It requires no chemicals (pesticides and herbicides) to grow, has remarkably few natural enemies, and increases in the most extensive variety of climates of any weed or plant. It is also the fastest growing plant on the planet, growing four times faster than corn. The farmers did not need to pay for seeds. Industrial hemp has no psychoactive effects (less than 1 per cent THC).

Paper made from hemp was used for books, bibles, maps, and money, manufacturing with hemp produce four times as much paper from an acre of hemp as you can from an acre of trees at four times lower cost, one-fifth the pollution, it is ten times stronger and lasts up to one thousand years instead of only fifty. And it can be recycled four times as many times as paper from wood pulp.

However, banned by law in 1930 by the Marijuana Act, a result of most powerful families in America, the Harriman’s and Rockefellers (Standard Oil), the Whitney’s (Eli Whitney-Cotton Gin), DuPont (Chemicals in wood pulp processing and cotton pesticides), and Hearst (Newspapers, Media) did not find any profit earned on Hemp, therefore, promoted cotton. (source The secret history of America: the greatest conspiracy on earth by David Icke)

Paradigm-shift of the fashion revolution. Graphics Kenneth Buddha Jeans

The Fashion paradigm-shift


Contents


  • Manufacturing
  • Standard (garment)
  • Design
  • Social responsibility
  • Business objectives
  • Products
  • Quantity
  • Business model
  • Characteristics
  • Materials standard
  • Materials
  • Market
  • Trends


Fast fashion age


  • Mass
  • Conformity
  • Uniformity
  • Exploitation
  • Profitability
  • New fabrics
  • More garments
  • Fast fashion
  • Non-sustainable (poor)
  • New materials
  • Recycled materials
  • Market driven
  • Fashion looks


Refashioned age


  • Hand-made
  • Uniqueness
  • Diversity
  • Charity (give back)
  • Responsible profitability
  • Reconstructed old
  • Less garment
  • Slow fashion
  • Sustainable (endurable)
  • Exciting materials
  • Upcycled materials
  • Market driving (creative)
  • Style with a cause

  • Refashioned, making cutting edge clothing from upcycled material by Sass Brown. Published by Laurence King Publishing 2013
  • Remake It Clothes By Henrietta Thompson illustrations by Neal Whittington. Published by Thames & Hudson 2012
  • Encore! The New Artisans by Olivier Dupon. Published by Thames & Hudson 2015
  • Refashioning the future is Buddha Jeans Gallery on Google Arts & Culture
  • The secret history of America: the greatest conspiracy on earth by David Icke (hemp fibre)

CHECK OUT THE NEW ECO-FASHION ENCYCLOPEDIA WITH MORE THAN 1200 ILLUSTRATED TERMS
ECO-FASHION-DENIM AND DIAGRAMS ENCYCLOPEDIA OVERVIEW


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